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IN SHORTS

State bodies to be reformed

CENTRAL state bodies, rather than ministries, will undergo a major reform.

While six such bodies will remain in their current form, others will work under specific ministries, some will be merged, and some will be abolished altogether, the Slovak daily SME wrote.

With the reform, the Finance Ministry wants to make state administration operations more effective and save money.

The ministry does not yet know how many state employees will lose jobs as a result of the reform, nor how much money will actually be saved.

One of the bodies to be abolished is the Office for Normalisation, Metrology, and Testing, whose powers will be taken over by the Economy Ministry, as will those of the State Reserves Fund Administration.

The Telecom Office, the Broadcasting and Retransmission Board, and the Post Office should be merged into one. The Statistics Office will work under the Finance Ministry, and a new Legal Services Office will be created to represent Slovakia in international and domestic court cases.

The offices that will be maintained include the Cabinet Office, National Security Office, Antitrust Authority, and Public Procurement Office.

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