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Surviving Slovakia

THOUGH staying in Slovakia has become easier for foreigners than it was 10 or 20 years ago, there are still some problems and nuances one might come across. But these can be avoided if the right questions are answered.
Therefore, The Slovak Spectator is introducing a regular column called "Surviving Slovakia" in cooperation with Ivona Telekiová, general manager of the Bratislava-based company Relocation (www.relo.sk).

THOUGH staying in Slovakia has become easier for foreigners than it was 10 or 20 years ago, there are still some problems and nuances one might come across. But these can be avoided if the right questions are answered.

Therefore, The Slovak Spectator is introducing a regular column called "Surviving Slovakia" in cooperation with Ivona Telekiová, general manager of the Bratislava-based company Relocation (www.relo.sk). We will provide you with answers to all the possible questions you might ask in relation to your stay in Slovakia. For example:


*Now that Slovakia has joined the EU, are there any changes in immigration procedures? What kind of permission do I need to be able to work and live here?

* Do I need to get a Slovak driver's license if I will be driving here?

* Are there any international schools or kindergartens outside Bratislava?

* My parents were Slovak citizens. What should I do to get Slovak citizenship?

* What should I be aware of when looking for an apartment in Bratislava?


We will be happy to answer not only the questions of foreigners coming to Slovakia but also those of Slovaks travelling abroad.

Please mail your questions to surviving.slovakia@gpp.sk and we will answer them either in our new column or via email.


Let's tackle the first question: Now that Slovakia has joined the EU, are there any changes in immigration procedures? What kind of permission do I need to be able to work and live here?

Slovakia has decided not to introduce a "transition period" for any citizens of EU countries, which basically means that no work permit or residence permit is necessary to work here.

All that needs to be done is to have your employer register you at the Labour, Social Affairs, and Family Office once you start working here and also inform them once your working contract or assignment here is finished.

The Foreign Police office does not require any registration. However, you may be registered if you would like to stay here on a long-term basis, but even this is not obligatory.

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