IN SHORT

Parliament wants Christian values in EU

THE SLOVAK Parliament wants the preamble of the EU's constitutional treaty to mention Christian values in Europe, lawmakers agreed on June 14 when discussing the issues to be addressed at the EU summit on June 17 and 18.

They also think it is necessary to maintain one commissioner per country in future European Commissions, and some form of the existing, six-month rotating presidency in the European Council, the news wire TASR wrote.

However, Christian Democratic MP František Mikloško failed to convince MPs to preserve the rotating presidency as it is, or to exclude the EU's Charter of Basic Rights from the document to be discussed in Brussels on Thursday and Friday.

Mikloško also failed to garner support for his proposal to retain the unanimous vote in foreign policies, defence, taxation, penal and civil law, judicial and police cooperation, and asylum and migration.

Parliament did not oblige PM Mikuláš Dzurinda to push forward the agreed-upon policies once at the EU summit, nor did they bind him to reject the constitution if it lacks the policies.

Mikloško expressed his disappointment following the vote on the final resolution, and unsuccessfully demanded that it be withdrawn.

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