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A brand-new Bratislava

BRATISLAVA officials realise that the Slovak capital is not a well-known tourist destination and aim to improve its image on the tourist market.
"So far, the Bratislava 'brand' has lacked the main attributes [of a normal brand] - a logo and a slogan. As of last spring, it now has both. The new logo and the city's visual style are being enforced in the city's advertising and the new slogan is the 'Little Big City'," said Milan Vajda, spokesman of the Bratislava mayor.
The city government wants to present Bratislava as a city that has everything that a metropolis should have but in "human dimensions", meaning that, though everything can be easily reached in the reconstructed historical city centre, it is never over-saturated with tourists, so visitors can relax and enjoy themselves


THE CAPITAL presents itself in a new light.
photo: Ján Svrček

BRATISLAVA officials realise that the Slovak capital is not a well-known tourist destination and aim to improve its image on the tourist market.

"So far, the Bratislava 'brand' has lacked the main attributes [of a normal brand] - a logo and a slogan. As of last spring, it now has both. The new logo and the city's visual style are being enforced in the city's advertising and the new slogan is the 'Little Big City'," said Milan Vajda, spokesman of the Bratislava mayor.

The city government wants to present Bratislava as a city that has everything that a metropolis should have but in "human dimensions", meaning that, though everything can be easily reached in the reconstructed historical city centre, it is never over-saturated with tourists, so visitors can relax and enjoy themselves. Other attributes of the city are its growth dynamics, safety, and youth, which served as the basis for the city's newly designed promotion materials.

The brochures introduce the city's history, its sights, and spots of interest, including a list of cultural events, information on accommodation and travel, and restaurant tips.

The capital plans to redesign its official internet website, www.bratislava.sk, in several language versions, and is also thinking of issuing a book of Bratislava photographs.

The first steps Bratislava visitors take should lead to the Bratislava Culture and Information Centre on Klobučnícka 2, which will expand its services and lengthen its office hours effective July 1. Another novelty will be maps in A4 format printed in six languages - English, German, Italian, Hungarian, Spanish, and Japanese.

Visitors will be able to purchase select products and services in euros, find private accommodations, and order dinners featuring traditional Slovak specialities along with cultural programmes. Sightseeing tours will increase their number of offered languages, and the centre's historical tram will ride each Wednesday and Saturday in the afternoon and evening.

Moreover, the programme for the Bratislava Summer of Culture can also be accessed on the Vienna city website.


Compiled by Spectator staff

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