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One in two Slovaks think genetically modified food harms health

HALF of polled Slovaks think that genetically modified food has a negative effect on people’s health, the TNS agency told the SITA news wire.

The agency carried out the survey in May on a representative sample of 1,015 respondents to monitor the attitude of Slovaks towards modified foods. Slovakia's EU membership has automatically allowed the use of some genetically modified foods on Slovak territory.

The view that genetically modified food has a detrimental effect on health was held more often by younger people between the ages of 18 to 29 and 30 to 39, people with higher levels of education, and respondents living in larger cities - in Bratislava and Košice.

Only one in 10 of those polled could not judge the influence of such products on human health.

Three-quarters of respondents are familiar with the concept of genetically modified food. Familiarity with the term grows with the level of education and the size of the municipality they live in.

Three-quarters of those polled would also reconsider the consumption of a product, should they find a warning about genetic modification on its packaging.

Of those polled, 36 percent would not consume a genetically modified food product at all and 38 percent would reduce their consumption of it.

Only a quarter of respondents would continue to consume a product containing genetically modified ingredients without any reduction.

Compiled by Beata Balogová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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