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INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP DISCOVERS NEW MUSIC STARS

Splendour of youth and talent

MATURITY and youth... Can they come together? Can an artistic talent manifest itself at a very early age or does it need many years to be formed and refined? Such questions arose during the final concert of the Third International Master Classes Musica Arvenzis on July 22 at the Mirror Hall of the Primate's Palace in Bratislava.
Nine young musicians - six pianists and three violinists - from various countries, aged between 10 and 24 years, appeared on stage that evening. They performed compositions by Chopin, Liszt, Bramhs, Ravel, Telemann, Vieuxtemps, and Souza.


KOPELMAN with the youngest participant, Danis.
photo: Lidia Staub

MATURITY and youth... Can they come together? Can an artistic talent manifest itself at a very early age or does it need many years to be formed and refined? Such questions arose during the final concert of the Third International Master Classes Musica Arvenzis on July 22 at the Mirror Hall of the Primate's Palace in Bratislava.

Nine young musicians - six pianists and three violinists - from various countries, aged between 10 and 24 years, appeared on stage that evening. They performed compositions by Chopin, Liszt, Bramhs, Ravel, Telemann, Vieuxtemps, and Souza.

"The Master Classes are held annually in Dolný Kubín, north-central Slovakia. This place serves as an incredible source of young musical talent. Just imagine, in such a small town there are two music schools, which educate 1,500 students!" said Jozef Kopelman, both a professor at the Music Academy and the Artistic Director of the Master Classes. Giving a concert in front of a hall full of people in the centre of Slovakia's capital would challenge even experienced musicians. Naturally, the young musicians showed some signs of excitement and nervousness. But even the stress of the public appearance could not diminish the splendour of youth and talent.

All the participants demonstrated outstanding musical skills: beautiful sound, technical ability, richness of musical expression, and an understanding of dramaturgy.

Especially impressive was the very mature piano interpretation of Dora Delyiska and Konstantin Djulgerov (both from Bulgaria). Pianist brothers Peter and Ladislav Fančovič from Slovakia demonstrated a splendid virtuoso style. Emmelina Littau from Germany and Fedor Kosoy from Russia charmed the public with their spontaneity and lyricism in their piano performances. Violinists Bernadett Domany from Hungary and Sylvia Petrášová from Slovakia developed a beautiful sound and flexible musical intonation. And the youngest participant of the Master Classes, Slovak violinist Karol Danis, won the audience's most enthusiastic applause for his bright, masterful and touching performance.

Not only were the students nervous that evening, but so were the professors who prepared them for the final concert. Peter Čerman, Zuzana Čižmarovičová, Marina Kapatsinskaja worked with the pianists, and Jozef Kopelman instructed the violinists.

"In three years we have had 250 participants from nearly 25 countries," Kopelman explained. "We invite the best teachers from Europe - Vladislav Brunner from Germany, Marina Kapatsinskaja from Bulgaria, Orfeo Mandozzi from Austria, Zdeněk Tilsa from the Czech Republic and, of course, Slovak professors like Peter Čerman. We work very intensely; during the day there are master classes, in the evening - concerts. In eight days the students give seven concerts in neighbouring villages plus a final one in Bratislava. Public appearance is like an exam that helps to verify the results of the studies. It's also our gift to the locality that creates an opportunity to organise these classes."

The International Masterclasses Musica Arvenzis are held thanks to the patronage of the wife of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Zdenka Kukanová, and the financial support of the Cultural Ministry and the Bratislava Music Centre.

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