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Reader feedback: On Kia land, the law's the law

Re: The state strikes back, By Beata Balogová, Aug 23 - 28, Vol 10, No 32

I think one has to be careful that one does not choose sides [on the debate over the expropriation of land for the coming Kia car plant] based solely on emotions. This Mr Kočner may have his own agenda for having purchased a portion of the now disputed land, but he made an agreement with the previous owners and the land was transferred into his company's name by the Deeds Office. It is his given right to buy the land, and it is his given right to oppose seizure on account of reasons he regards to be faulty. From here onwards the law must speak.

"Which law?" you may ask - well, the existing laws regarding property ownership. No law is ultimately everlasting, however (outside the 10 commandments I suppose), especially not considering the fact that Slovakia is a very new country and has recently joined the EU. In actual fact, no matter what Mr Kočner's motives really are, he may be doing the country a favour by being instrumental in further shaping Slovak property law.

Oscar,
Radošovce, Slovakia

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