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MOVIES

NOW PLAYING IN CINEMAS

This week's premiere (s)


photo: Tatrafilm

Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story (Vybíjaná: Choď do toho na plné gule) - Comedy by Rawson Marshall Thurber. Is there anything more entertaining than other people's pain? The game of dodgeball presumes there isn't. And so comes Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story, which blends the sadistic glee of the sport most people outgrow after adolescence with the brand of comedy most of them also outgrow at around the same time. Vince Vaughn plays Peter LeFleur, the owner of a small gym threatened by the bullying Globo Gym. In an attempt to save his gym from the hostile takeover, Peter organises his motley crew of friends to challenge Globo's owner (Ben Stiller) to a winner-takes-all dodgeball match.



photo: Itafilm

Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid (Anakonda 2: Honba za krvavou orchideou) - Action horror by Dwight Little. 1997's Anaconda, which depicted a team of filmmakers who went into the jungle in search of a lost tribe but instead found a giant maneating snake, was notable primarily for its odd cast: Jennifer Lopez, Jon Voight, Ice Cube, and Owen Wilson. Its new sequel, by contrast, is notable for having no actors worth noting. It seems that a large pharmaceutical firm has learned that, deep in the jungle of Borneo, there lives a rare black orchid that can lead to immortality. So the company sends in a team to find it. Unfortunately, the jungle also contains a number of anacondas that seem rather attached to the rare flower: It has exponentially increased their size and strength. And, oh yeah, they like to eat humans.


Other movies playing



photo: Tatrafilm

The Bourne Supremacy (Bournov mýtus) - Action thriller by Paul Greengrass. 2002's The Bourne Identity was a surprisingly good time. It was difficult not to be entertained as Jason Bourne (Matt Damon), a skilled spy suffering from amnesia, scrambled across Europe, evading bounty hunters and CIA agents. Unsurprisingly, he escaped and managed to pick up a girl, Marie (Franka Potente), along the way. Unfortunately, former CIA assassins have difficulty avoiding their past. And so, in The Bourne Supremacy (part 2 of a trilogy), Bourne is lured out of hiding. He must try to piece together his past, protect Marie and himself, and thwart the plans of evildoers. Joan Allen, Julia Stiles, and Brian Cox also reprise their roles from the first movie.


Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Večný svit nepoškvrnenej mysle) - Comedy drama by Michael Gondry. Screenwriter Charlie Kaufman's movies can be extremely difficult to get through. With Being John Malkovich, Adaptation, and Human Nature, he proved himself one of the most innovative writers working in film today. But Kaufman can be a little too clever for his own good: He's so committed to irregular stories and characters that he sometimes seems to forget that the audience must care about what it sees. His latest script is a distinct move in the right direction. Its central story of two lovers (Jim Carrey and Kate Winslet) who each erase the other from his or her memory is far more human and sweet than any of his prior work. However, being a Kaufman script, it's full of characteristic strangeness and confusion. It also stars Kirsten Dunst, Mark Ruffalo, Tom Wilkinson, and Elijah Wood.


The Stepford Wives (Stepfordské paničky) - Comedy by Frank Oz. It was such a great idea to make a campy comedy out of the 1970s feminist horror classic The Stepford Wives, in which a group of suburban husbands band together to turn their wives into mindless robots. And who could be more perfect for the icy lead role than Nicole Kidman, the leading Hollywood survivor of the 21st century? Well, it should have been great. But, sadly, it isn't. The movie takes feminism for granted and, in doing so, is regressive. And the comedy is every bit as artificial as Stepford's wives. Generally, when making a comedy, it's a good idea to make genuine humour a priority.


Prepared by Jonathan Knapp



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