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Dancing across borders

ARTISTS from Slovakia and its neighbour, Austria, join forces in a project entitled The Borders, to be presented at the Medium Gallery on Bratislava's Hviezdoslavovo Square, October 19 and 20. The project is part of the Bratislava in Movement festival and includes dance performances, video-projects, installations and lectures.
TanzQuartier from Vienna and the Bratislava in Movement Association - have put together the multi-media presentation based on the theme of crossing borders in public life; the result of an open dialogue among artists, interested intellectuals and academics.

ARTISTS from Slovakia and its neighbour, Austria, join forces in a project entitled The Borders, to be presented at the Medium Gallery on Bratislava's Hviezdoslavovo Square, October 19 and 20. The project is part of the Bratislava in Movement festival and includes dance performances, video-projects, installations and lectures.

TanzQuartier from Vienna and the Bratislava in Movement Association - have put together the multi-media presentation based on the theme of crossing borders in public life; the result of an open dialogue among artists, interested intellectuals and academics.

The performers started to work on the project in the autumn of last year. With the sub-title Border Control: Duty Free Fiction, the presentation elaborates on the various interpretations borders might suggest.

According to the festival's director Miroslava Kovářová, the two-day presentation will offer the viewers only a brief insight into the creative and complex searching the artists and intellectuals shared. Apart from dance performances, visitors can also watch short movies on the theme produced by the artists.

"We will present a documentary on refugees and various forms of crossing borders, as well as crossing borders in everyday life," Kovářová said, adding that an archive of all documentaries will be accessible through installed monitors.

Professor Miroslav Marcelli, co-author of the project's concept, said: "The theme of borders offers a new perspective on what has actually happened with public space after the unification of Europe. There has been a revival of political art. An art that captures the politics of everyday life."

Prepared by Spectator staff

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