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Bratislava welcomes Hungarian culture

AN INITIATIVE from the Hungarian Culture Intstitute, Hungarian Culture Days, will present eleven events, ranging from art exhibitions, theatre and dance shows to literary readings and film screenings, at nine venues in Bratislava, October 21 to 25.
"We hope that the week brings meaningful experiences for the public in Bratislava - one that will foster mutual understanding between our two nations," said the institute's director, Éva Czimbalmosné Molnár.


BUDAPEST band fuses klezmer with folk.
photo: Courtesy of the Hungarian Culture Institute

AN INITIATIVE from the Hungarian Culture Intstitute, Hungarian Culture Days, will present eleven events, ranging from art exhibitions, theatre and dance shows to literary readings and film screenings, at nine venues in Bratislava, October 21 to 25.

"We hope that the week brings meaningful experiences for the public in Bratislava - one that will foster mutual understanding between our two nations," said the institute's director, Éva Czimbalmosné Molnár.

Marianne Wieber's fashion show, Costumes of Thousand-year History, will open Hungarian Culture Days at 18:00 at the Primate's Palace. The fifty or so robes, mapping the fashion trends from the arrival of Hungarians to the Carpathian valley up to the 19th century, will then be exhibited at the nearby Town's Museum until November 25.

Among other performances, visitors can hear the Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra give a ceremonious concert on October 23, Hungarian National Holiday, at the Slovak Philharmonic.

The Budapest Klezmer Band will combine traditional Jewish music with elements of jazz and classical music mixed with Hungarian folk.

Prepared by Spectator staff

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