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HISTORY TALKS...

Svätý Jur


A PICTURESQUE town in the Small Carpathians, Svätý Jur's emblem depicts St George killing the dragon with his lance. In medieval times, local lords adopted some of the fighting attributes of the famous dragon-slayer.
Since the town's benefactor patronised soldiers, knights and warriors, these local aristocrats preferred to earn their respect by wielding a sword rather than a pen.



A PICTURESQUE town in the Small Carpathians, Svätý Jur's emblem depicts St George killing the dragon with his lance. In medieval times, local lords adopted some of the fighting attributes of the famous dragon-slayer.

Since the town's benefactor patronised soldiers, knights and warriors, these local aristocrats preferred to earn their respect by wielding a sword rather than a pen. As a result they counted among some of the most feared lords in the Small Carpathians, their influence stretching even to Bratislava.

This picture from 1921 shows the upper reaches of the village - Neštich, its large church dominating the view. The vineyards in the foreground remind the viewer that Svätý Jur was, and still is, one of Slovakia's best-known wine localities.


Prepared by Branislav Chovan, Special to the Spectator

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