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Bulgarian artist hits town

RADOSTINA Doganova, from Bulgaria, held an one night show in Bratislava December 2. A graduate of the Slovak Academy of Fine Arts, she has lived in Bratislava since her student days.
Doganova is one of the newest emerging artists to present her work to the Bratislava art market, and she has made quite a splash. A relatively large audience turned out to meet the artist and view her work.
On show were 25 paintings, large and small, exhibiting an energetic and daring talent.


photo: Radostina Doganova

RADOSTINA Doganova, from Bulgaria, held an one night show in Bratislava December 2. A graduate of the Slovak Academy of Fine Arts, she has lived in Bratislava since her student days.

Doganova is one of the newest emerging artists to present her work to the Bratislava art market, and she has made quite a splash. A relatively large audience turned out to meet the artist and view her work.

On show were 25 paintings, large and small, exhibiting an energetic and daring talent.

Her work displays both cool and vibrant colours; a whirlwind of order splashed onto the canvas. She has been able to capture the essence of the subject and its identity: a painting of trees merely a series of lines, a flower a circular motion of lines.

Other paintings are more abstract, sublime works evoking feelings and emotions that make one feel calm, at peace.

And she is not afraid to experiment, and shows it.


By Asieh Nassehi-Javan, Special to the Spectator



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