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The Andrássy Mausoleum

AN ART-NOUVEAU marvel from the early 20th century, the Andrássy mausoleum sits beneath the Krásna Hôrka Castle in eastern Slovakia. It was built by Dionýz Andrássy, the last descendant of the Andrássy dynasty, who controlled Krásna Hôrka for almost 400 years.



AN ART-NOUVEAU marvel from the early 20th century, the Andrássy mausoleum sits beneath the Krásna Hôrka Castle in eastern Slovakia. It was built by Dionýz Andrássy, the last descendant of the Andrássy dynasty, who controlled Krásna Hôrka for almost 400 years.

The Andrássys were renowned for fighting the Turks, and as prominent feudal lords, enjoyed widespread respect in Hungary. Dionýz tarnished the family name, however, when he secretly married Františka Hablavcová, a commoner with no property or rank. His father disinherited him.

On his deathbed, though, Adrássy senior forgave his son, and Dionýz inherited great wealth. While word of Dionýz's new fortune spread through the lounges of Hungary's upper class, he and his wife began to spend their money quite untraditionally - on charity.

This picture from the 1920s shows Dionýz had blue blood in him, too. He and his wife are buried in the splendid tomb.

Prepared by Branislav Chovan, Special to the Spectator

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