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Slovak tourists back from Sri Lanka

Bratislava airport welcomed back 74 tourists December 30 who returned from the region hit by the world’s deadliest natural disaster. There were 71 Slovaks, 2 Americans living in Slovakia and a Russian on the board of a special airplane, according to the daily SME.

Foreign Affairs Ministry spokesman Juraj Tomaga told the press that
only three Slovak students stayed on the island.
However, he has not excluded that there are other Slovaks left on Sri Lanka.
There are no missing Slovaks reported from Thailand, India, Indonesia or
Malaysia yet. More journalists than relatives were waiting for the returning
Slovaks.

On December 29 the plane brought ten tons of humanitarian aid worth Sk6.6
million (€170,103) to Sri Lanka after the 9.0 magnitude undersea earthquake
unleashed tsunamis that devastated coastal regions.

Among those waiting for their returning relatives was also ex-MP Peter Weiss
who came to meet his son, who was flying as a crew member.



Compiled by Beata Balogová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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