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THE SLOVAK NATIONAL MUSEUM'S REGULAR SPECTATOR COLUMN

Home of Hungarian culture

EFFORTS to establish a museum to represent the traditions and values of the Hungarian minority in Slovakia stretch back decades. The history, popular culture and customs of Hungarians living in Slovakia are many and varied. However, the question was always how to approach the representation of this varied and rich experience.
As an initial step, a documentation centre for Hungarian culture was founded at the Brämer mansion, near Bratislava, in July 2001. This independent department formed a link between Hungarian culture and Slovak institutions.


HUNGARIAN artefacts on show.
Photo: Courtesy of SNM

EFFORTS to establish a museum to represent the traditions and values of the Hungarian minority in Slovakia stretch back decades. The history, popular culture and customs of Hungarians living in Slovakia are many and varied. However, the question was always how to approach the representation of this varied and rich experience.

As an initial step, a documentation centre for Hungarian culture was founded at the Brämer mansion, near Bratislava, in July 2001. This independent department formed a link between Hungarian culture and Slovak institutions.

In July 2002 the documentation centre became the Museum of Hungarian Culture.

The main task of the museum is to represent the culture of the Hungarian minority in Slovakia through collections, exhibitions and research.

The museum's permanent exhibition is entitled Traditions and Values - Hungarians in Slovakia. The 320-metre space comprises pictures, documents and objects that trace the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Hungarians in Slovakia over three decisive decades, from 1918 to 1948.

The Cellar-gallery housing more objects is located in the beautiful old wine cellar of the mansion.


THE BRAMER mansion as it was...
Photo: Courtesy of SNM

The Brämer mansion itself has a fascinating history. It was built during the second half of the 16th century. It has four wings enclosing a central courtyard.

The building is named after an officer from Bratislava who converted it into a two-storey mansion.

In his book Notitiae Hungarie novae historico-geographicae Matthias Bel mentions a "chronostikon" that was situated on the facade and states: "VirtVtVIs CoMes InVIDIa". According to Bel the building was rebuilt in 1620.

The whole west wing, the stairs, the facade and the corner towers with their semicircle bases were built during the renaissance alterations.

The northern wing evolved during the early baroque period of the early 18th century. Although the ownership of the mansion often changed hands the main characteristics of the building did not alter.

The Brämer mansion is part of the tiny area that is preserved from the old castle district around the baroque Trinity-temple.


... and as it is now.
Photo: Courtesy of SNM

Múzeum kultúry Maďarov na Slovensku (Museum of Hungarian Culture in Slovakia) is situated at Žižkova 18, Bratislava. It is open daily except Monday from 10:00 to 17:00. For more information call 02/5441-2021.

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