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Plans for SND change hands

THE RULING coalition parties decided yesterday that the Economy Minister Pavol Rusko would no longer be responsible for handling future changes at the Slovak National Theatre (SND) building.

According to the ruling parties’ decision, Culture Minister Rudolf Chmel will assume responsibility for the plans for the building.

Rusko planned to sell the SND building to US firm Truthheim Invest, which intended to turn the complex into a conference and business centre, while allowing the country's artistic institutions to rent some of the premises for performances.

It still remains most likely that a private firm will complete and run the SND building. However, chairman of the ruling Christian Democrats, Pavol Hrušovský, believes that the firm will be chosen in a proper tender in which several firms will be able to compete.

The Coalition Board, a senior ruling parties' body, proposed three possible solutions to Chmel on how to proceed with the SND.

The SME daily reported that the Coalition Board suggested one option whereby Chmel continues with the plans prepared by Rusko and go ahead with Truthheim as the SND's new investor.

A second suggestion is to announce a tender. A third is to stop building work at the SND altogether and use the money saved in this way to repair Slovakia's existing theatres.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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