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Reader feedback: Why make things more complicated?

Re: New rules for Slovak citizenship proposed, Volume 11, Number 1, January 10 - January 16, 2005

The old rules [for gaining citizenship] were already complicated and bureaucratic enough.

They also took plenty of time. Why make it longer?

Anyone born to Slovak parents abroad can claim citizenship, yet the embassies around the world most often encourage those who were born between 1945-1993 to first become a Foreign Slovak, a needless step, and a waste of time and money.

Greece and Ireland allow you to become a citizen with only one grandparent. Naturalization in Slovakia is more difficult than in Belgium.

They are just creating needless bureaucracy without revealing what the real reasons are for doing so.

BB,
Munich, Germany

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