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Reader feedback: Fears unfounded

I think that the fears that this constitution may be a stepping stone towards the forming of a European superstate are unfounded. If there is ever going to be a call for such a state, the majority is likely to want it. The non-inclusion of a reference to our Christian heritage on the other hand, is based on factors that are not inherent to a constitution per se; the major one being that the designers wanted to accommodate Islam. It is, in fact, rather unnatural to leave out this reference [to Christianity], for one cannot annihilate two positives (Christianity and Islam in this case). One could only annihilate [both religions] if the designers were trying to accommodate atheists (the majority of whom have no qualms with the reference). Be that as it may, I can't see a problem [in leaving out the reference]. If and when Slovaks adopt the proposed constitution, it will be on the basis that it is considered part of the [new] Slovak constitution, one that would read the same but carry the reference in addition.


Oscar,
Radošovce, Slovakia

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