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Reader feedback: Makes no sense

Re: Head of Anti-Corruption Bureau sacked, Flash News, January 19, 2005

The whole thing makes no sense to anybody. In the summer, [Interior Minister Vladmir] Palko was great friends with [then head of Anti-Corruption Bureau Jozef] Šátek. He wanted to promote him to general and he was the only policeman who was invited to the launch of the minister's Power Struggle book.

Now Palko sacks him for "playing office politics", but everyone has known that Šátek was an awkward sod that has refused to listen to anyone since about 2000. That wasn't a problem before so why is it suddenly a problem now?

People are speculating about all sorts of wild things: that Šátek was investigating things close to Palko and the KDH [Christian Democratic Movement, of which Palko is a member]; that the KDH needs to increase its coalition potential.

But no one really knows anything.

I'm beginning to feel like my head will explode with all this.


Roger Heyes,
Žilina, Slovakia

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