Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

IN SHORT

Constitutional Court rejects Stahl appeal

THE CONSTITUTIONAL Court ruled that Ján Jasovský should take over the chairmanship of the Supreme Audit Office immediately, according to the daily Pravda.

The man he is replacing, Jozef Stahl, believed he had the right to stay in the post for another two years and had appealed against Jasovský's appointment.

Stahl's argument was based on a change to the constitution that extends the appointment of top NKÚ officials from five to seven years.

The court ruled, however, that because Stahl had originally been appointed for five years, he was not entitled to the extra two.

In reaction to the court's ruling Stahl said, "I respect the verdict. Maybe I'll stay on at the NKÚ as an ordinary employee."

Jasovský commented, "It was unnecessary. I could have been working in the office for two months already."

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.