NEWS BRIEFS

Domestic news interests most

READERS of daily papers in Slovakia are most interested in articles relating to domestic policy, a new survey revealed.

The survey, called "Čítanie 2004" (Reading 2004), was conducted by the Literacy Information Centre and Institute for Culture Research NOC, using a sample of 1,500 respondents, according to the daily SME.

Some 28.8 percent of readers favour reading articles relating to domestic affairs. In contrast, only 1 percent favour articles on foreign policy.

This represents a year-on-year jump of 1.3 percent for domestic issues while foreign policy interest has halved and is last in the list of readers' interest.

The society pages were the second favourite section, with 17.9 percent, up by 1.3 percent on last year. Sport came in third on the list, with 14.5 percent of readers saying this was the section they preferred.

The fourth favourite section amongst Slovak readers was world news, with 13.3 percent of readers, then economics with 9.3 percent, culture with 4.7 percent and crime at 4.3 percent.

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