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Protest group to exercise rights

ACTIVISTS from the “aniPUTINaniBUSH” (neitherPUTINnorBUSH) group will hold a gathering with opportunity for debate and a video presentation during the Bush-Putin summit.

Spokesperson Štefan Szilva says the group only wants to express its opinions by employing freedom of speech and the right of public assembly. However, he doesn't expect many people to attend the gathering due to strict security, the TASR news service reported.

Although the activists have registered to use three of Bratislava's squares, they have decided to hold the demonstration in only one. The details of their programme will be released on February 16. They have not invited any foreign demonstrators.

Interior Ministry press department spokesperson Monika Kuhajdová says that police are prepared to secure the summit and that the number of police in action will depend on any given situation.

People should expect queues at the borders and airports, since security checks on people, luggage and vehicles are being intensified.

The ministry has purchased special automotive security equipment, armaments and sappers’ equipment for the summit. Kuhajdová calls it "a long term investment" because police will continue to use the equipment after the summit ends.

Compiled by Beata Balogová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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