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Tuition fees fail again

IT appears that some members of the ruling coalition are losing their nerve over passing legislation to introduce university tuition fees, according to the daily Pravda.

Education Minister Martin Fronc was expected to present his proposals to the government for the fourth time on February 17, but they could not even get on the agenda. Previous versions of the education reforms were rejected by parliament.

The main party blocking the proposals was the Hungarian Coalition Party (SMK). Its Deputy Education Minister László Szigeti argues that such a major reform should not be made in the second half of a government, when elections are approaching.

The New Citizen’s Alliance (ANO) also blocked the move, but did not specify its reasons. However, its deputy leader, Jirko Malchárek, said that the party would like to hold discussions with Fronc by the end of February to suggest amendments.

The proposal for tuition fees was originally developed
by Fronc and Finance Minister Ivan Mikloš. If passed, the universities would be allowed to charge students up to
Sk21,000 (EUR 550) per year.

A large part of the money would be used to provide students in financial need with low-interest loans or grants.

The Finance Minister has become more interested in projects for lifelong learning, school pupils and projects to increase the use of computers.

Compiled by Roger Heyes from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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