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Reader feedback: Transparency, please

Re: Slovak diplomats hope Bush talks visas, Volume 11, Number 6, February 14, 2005

This issue of visa-free entry to the US is a very important one. If nothing else, President Bush should demand that all Slovaks, as part of a democratic and free society in Slovakia, should be informed of the criteria to obtain a visa to the US and notified in writing the reason for denial, should an applicant be denied.

A refund of the application fee should be given if denied.

I also have family in Slovakia that applied [for a US visa] and was denied. I personally have contacted my senators and congressman to encourage that this issue be addressed at the summit with some resolve for the Slovaks.

Good Lord knows we have enough other foreign visitors here in the US, but not enough Slovaks!

If Slovaks were allowed visa-free entry to US, then more Americans would encounter them and know where Slovakia is!

philka,
Indiana, US

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