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Divine engravings

.ALTHOUGH Slovakia is a small country, it possesses a creative and hugely varied folk culture. This is evident in music, architecture and even churchyard crosses.

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ALTHOUGH Slovakia is a small country, it possesses a creative and hugely varied folk culture. This is evident in music, architecture and even churchyard crosses.

This postcard from 1938 depicts a carved wooden cross in a cemetery in Detva, near Zvolen in Central Slovakia.

The name of the deceased is on the base of the cross. Adorning the upper parts are ancient symbols from different civilizations.

Below the carved figure of Jesus at the top of the cross is a circle, symbolizing light and life.

Divine symbols cover the rest of the cross. A chalice symbolizes wine, a holy drink. Below that are Christ's initials, IHS, and below these is a heart, a symbol of God's love.

The Turks introduced a new type of flower into Europe during the 16th century. Its stylized form decorates the side of this cross.

Crosses represent the four points of the horizon and are symbol of the divine.


By Branislav Chovan,
Special to the Spectator

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