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Poll: Slovaks give summit thumbs up

SIXTY-EIGHT percent of Slovaks think that the Bush-Putin summit will increase their country's prestige abroad.

That is according to a poll conducted by the Institute of Political Sciences of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, the SITA news agency reported.

Furthermore, 67 percent of respondents believe that the summit will improve the image of members of the Slovak cabinet.

The poll was conducted between February 3 and 10, with 2,221 respondents.

More than 50 percent of respondents thought that the summit will help Slovakia economically and 45 percent expected a positive influence on tourism.

Security was the issue that received the most negative reaction from respondents.

Thirty-five percent said the summit would increase the security threat against Slovak citizens. 42 percent do not expect any collateral damage from security. Nineteen percent think that the summit will help the security of people in this country.

In spite of the fact that most of the people see the summit as a positive event, bringing advantages to Slovakia, most of them view the amount of money spent negatively.

Sixty-five percent of respondents had a negative view of the amount and the way the money has been spent. Only 35 percent had a positive view.

Compiled by Spectator staff from press reports

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