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Cabinet approves university fees

THE SLOVAK cabinet yesterday approved the law on university fees, which, if passed in parliament, will take effect as of September 2005.

According to the law, which Education Minister Martin Fronc will try to push through parliament for the second time, students will pay up to 30 percent of the total annual fees per student, until now completely covered by the state.

Universities, however, will be entitled to set the fees anywhere between 0 and 30 percent, Pravda daily wrote.

To make sure students from poor families are not prevented from going to university, some students from poorer families will receive “social” stipends. Stipends will also be given to students achieving very high marks, so-called “motivational” stipends.

These will be paid for from the collected fees. 35 percent should go on motivational stipends and 30 to 35 percent of students will be eligible to receive social stipends.

Parliament will vote on the law during it regular session in March.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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