Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Internet access on the rise

A NEW poll carried out by the GfK agency in January this year showed that every other Slovak has access to the Internet, the SME daily reported.

In Bratislava, 56 percent of respondents said they had Internet access. Twenty-five percent said they could get the net at home as well, which is the highest percentage of all the Slovak regions.

The Internet, however, is also finding its way into smaller towns and villages around the country, thanks to lower connection prices.

Currently, the cheapest, but also the slowest, connection to the Internet costs Sk250 per month (€6.5). The Telecommunications Office recently published a long list of firms, which provide Internet connection for this price.

Most people connect to the Internet at work, in Internet cafés and libraries.

The number of households that have computers is also rising. In the summer of 2004 an MVK agency survey showed that 40.8 percent of households had a computer, which represented a 5 percent growth year-on-year.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Slovakia is the first country to test a new VAT refund app

Getting money back for buying souvenirs in Slovakia will be easier - there will be an app.

Illustrative Stock Photo

Prosecution has found errancies in criminal files related to self-employed farmers

General prosecutor feels that some prosecutors in the east of Slovakia follow their own conscience and opinion and not valid legislation.

General prosecutor Jaromír Čižnár

Begin afresh

I’m not sure if there is a typical Canadian way to get married.

Homophobic banners attributed to Ján Mrva give rise to criminal complaint

The Bratislava Mayoral candidate denies being behind the banners but has not condemned the contents argues NGO.

Ján Mrva