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Admirers of Tiso and his state decreasing

THE NUMBER people who admire the World War II Slovak state is rapidly decreasing, according to a February 2005 public opinion poll by the MVK agency.

The poll reveals that twice as many Slovaks are critical of the wartime regime than are admirers of it, the daily SME reported. In contrast, a similar survey in 1992 revealed a majority of admirers of the World War II regime.

Slovak Academy of Sciences sociology researcher, Vladimír Krivý, says the 1992 rating was the result of a wave of nationalism in Slovakia around the time. He also pointed out that this was part of a pattern amongst states that had “reached a crossroads” and were looking back to their pasts for an identity.

Most of the current admirers of Tiso belong pensioners and blue-collar workers' social groups. Those with a higher education qualification represent the fewest. However, one third of respondents expressed no opinion, which, according to Krivý, shows a large gap in the historical memory of the country.

The research shows that half of respondents believe that Tiso was personally responsible for deporting Slovak Jews. More than twenty percent believe that Tiso was not directly responsible for the deportations.

The 2005 survey shows that 4.8 percent of respondents see the World War II Slovak state in a very positive light. In the 1992 survey that figure was 8 percent.

The 2005 survey shows that 19.5 percent of respondents see Tiso’s regime in a “rather positive” light, compared to 18.2 percent in 1992.

Compiled by Magdalena MacLeod from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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