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Politicians slip through property loophole

THE VALUE of property owned by public officials in Slovakia will remain partly secret. Yesterday, MPs approved a measure that does not require them to list the value of property they own, the daily SME reported.

March 31 was also the deadline for MPs to submit their property declarations.

A proposal put forward by the ruling Slovak Democratic and Christian Union's Roman Vavrík, means that MPs do not have to specify the value of their houses, bank savings, and business shares in their property declarations, according to the daily.

Vavrík would make no comment on the issue, however.

Justice Minister Daniel Lipšic is already considering a more specific formulation of the law to fix the situation.

According to Pavel Nechala of Transparency International, MPs made use of a legal loophole. Nechala considers it wrong that MPs actually monitor themselves with respect to property declarations.

The declarations are submitted to a parliamentary committee, which consists of representatives from the parliamentary parties.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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