Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook


Slovaks want public media

NINE out of 10 Slovaks think that public broadcasting outlets should be operating alongside commercial outlets.

According to a survey of 3,409 respondents at the beginning of March this year by the public broadcaster Slovak Radio, only 3 percent of Slovaks think that public media outlets, which are partly funded from the state budget, should not exist.

People aged 30 to 49 years were the biggest fans of the idea of maintaining public radio and public TV, as well as people who had completed high school or university, the Pravda daily reported.

In terms of political leanings, the supporters of the non-parliamentary Slovak National Party and the ruling Christian Democratic Movement and the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union are the biggest supporters of public media.

The least support for the coexistence of both the public and the commercial media was found among 14 to 17 year-olds, people with only elementary school education, as well as potential voters of the ruling Hungarian Coalition Party and the liberal New Citizen's Alliance.

Top stories

UPDATED: Enough of Smer, people chanted in streets Photo

The resignation of the government is not enough. The crowd called for early elections.

Media are the ultimate frontiers in defending freedom in society today

Miklós Haraszti’s keynote speech at the Budapest award ceremony of the European Press Prize, March 14, 2018.

Fico is going. So why does the crisis continue?

These 10 answers will help you understand why the coalition’s decision to rebuild the government from scratch does not satisfy the critics and protesting masses.

Most-Híd chair Béla Bugár comes to the Government Office, March 13.

Peter Pellegrini to become new prime minister. Who is he? Photo

After two weeks of political crisis, Slovakia will have a new prime minister. Pellegrini came of age in Smer.

Peter Pellegrini (l), authorised to form a new government, and President Andrej Kiska (r)