Sickness down following new law

THE MISUSE of sick leave in Slovakia decreased considerably last year. The average sick leave rate fell from 5.1 percent to 3.7 percent year-on-year, particularly because of the new legislation, the Národná obroda daily reported.

According to the new laws, employers pay for the first 10 days of sick leave of their employees and only if the sick leave lasts longer does the Sociálna Poistovna (SP) social insurer start to pay.

"It has improved control over sick leave and increased the discipline of employees," said Igor Lipták of SP.

The trend has continued into 2005. In the first three months of this year sick leave has decreased by another 0.5 percent year-on-year.

Doctors argue, however, that the changes are to the detriment of people’s health.

Many employees now prefer taking a few days off rather than taking official sick leave because it is more advantageous for them financially.

"As a result they do not have enough days for a proper holiday, which can later have a negative impact on their health," said Ladislav Pásztor, the president of the Chamber of Private Doctors.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

News digest: The Gale targets corruption, cabinet officially prolongs curfew

Slovakia learned about biggest corporate taxpayers, the president signed laws changing the minimum wage and 13th pensions. Read the latest news overview.

Mobile testing units were built in the Hviezdoslavovo Square in Bratislava.

The big testing: When and where to show up, and what if I don't want to? (FAQ)

Here is what we know about the practicalities of the nationwide testing so far. Testing also applies to foreigners and diplomats in Slovakia.

Pilot testing in Bardejov

Storm transforms into Gale. More judges and an influential businessman detained

The police raid related to corruption in Bratislava courts.

Businessman Zoroslav Kollár (l) was brought to NAKA.