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Sad loss of gentle satirist

STANO Radič, the popular Slovak humorist, died suddenly at the age of 49 on April 8.
The comedian's intelligent and natural humour is a great loss to the country, for the politicians he often made gentle fun of, and the public at large, for whom he was an unlikely idol.

RADIČ's humour will be missed.
photo: SME - Ján Krošlák

STANO Radič, the popular Slovak humorist, died suddenly at the age of 49 on April 8.

The comedian's intelligent and natural humour is a great loss to the country, for the politicians he often made gentle fun of, and the public at large, for whom he was an unlikely idol.

Speaker of Parliament Pavol Hrušovský wrote in a letter to Radič's family: "All of Slovakia will miss Radič. His unique humour, wit and natural ability to put people in a good mood, will remain in my memory."

Radič was struck by a heart attack as he was driving a car in Bratislava streets with his daughter. According to the police, his daughter managed to stop the car and call an ambulance. Paramedics spent 40 minutes trying to revive Radič, but to no avail.

Originally a sociologist, Radič joined the comedy department of Slovak Radio in 1983. He became head of the office in 1990 and was a parliamentary deputy for Public Against Violence. Since 1993 he worked independently.

The "master of kind-hearted humour", as PM Mikuláš Dzurinda called him, performed in many television and radio programmes. He wrote radio, theatre and television comedies, in which he often played.

He worked closely with his friend, humorist and musician Jaro Filip, who died in 2000 at the age of 51. Milan Lasica, with whom he performed in TV Markíza's 7 sro, said that Radič's death is "a great loss for Slovak satire".

One of the humorist's regular radio programmes was Radič počasia (Weather "Forecaster"), on Radio Express, in which he amusingly forecast the situation on the Slovak political scene.

"I will miss his skill of sensitive and original criticism, not only as a viewer, but also as a politician," Hrušovský said.


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