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Mountain rescue service to charge for services

PARLIAMENT passed the first reading of a law that will require those searched for and rescued by Slovakia’s mountain rescue services to pay for the service.

Slovakia’s mountains attract climbers, hikers and winter sports enthusiasts from all over the world, but some forget that the mountains can be dangerous as well as beautiful.

Last year 12 people were killed in the High Tatras and 316 were injured (of whom 168 seriously). As more tourists visit Slovakia the strain on the Mountain Rescue Service is greater since the visitors are sometimes unaware of the dangers or ignore park wardens’ warnings.

The new law will also introduce provisions for visitors to the mountains to purchase insurance for their visit. It is expected that it will come into effect in 2006.

Compiled by Roger Heyes from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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