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US Steel to seek compensation for emissions

EASTERN Slovakia's steel maker US Steel Košice will ask the Slovak government to compensate for possible losses arising from the CO2-emissions’ allocations to be introduced in compliance with the European directive on emissions trading, the TASR news agency wrote.

Speaking to reporters, outgoing president Christopher Navetta said that US Steel could determine losses more specifically once the CO2 emissions trading has begun.
He added that the company had its emissions allowance under the Slovak national allocation plan cut by 8 percent, which can adversely affect the steel mill's output.

The EU and the Slovak government's conduct in reallocation was unfair, and the corporation will defend its business interests, said Navetta.

US Steel filed a legal complaint with an international court calling for the directives to cut the Slovak allocation plan for CO2 emissions to be rescinded and will urge the Slovak government to compensate it for losses if it cannot meet its contractual pledges.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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