Software piracy still big in Slovakia

SOFTWARE piracy in Slovakia was at 48 percent in 2004, which is two percent less than in 2003, the Hospodárske Noviny business daily wrote.

That means that almost every other piece of software installed on Slovak computers is illegal.

According to the study for the Business Software Alliance (BSA), prepared by International Data Corporation, the global software piracy rate decreased by one percent year-on-year, to 35 percent.

In Hungary, for instance, software piracy is at 44 percent and in the Czech Republic it is slightly better at 41 percent. In Poland, however, it is worse, with 59 percent of installed software being illegal.

Roman Sládek, the president of the BSA in Slovakia said that in the last three years the situation has improved, particularly in large and medium sized companies. The situation remains bad in small companies and in households, however.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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