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SIS report: Organized crime spreads its wings

THE SLOVAK Intelligence service (SIS) has published information about embezzlement from state owned companies by corrupt bureaucrats.

In its regular annual report presented in parliament yesterday, the SIS stated that it had information about the activities of the mafia, corruption at courts and in the police, the Pravda daily reported.

Experts noted, however, that much despite such information there is little follow-up because of a lack of effective cooperation between state security units.

"It is evident that there should be a coordination centre that would evaluate the information and distribute tasks. But that [centre] does not exist. Rather than trust, there is rivalry between [the state's several] intelligence service units," said Ivo Samson, a security analyst with the Slovak Foreign Policy Association.

As well as other information, the SIS pointed to several manipulated tenders and excessively expensive supplies for the reconstruction of railways. According to the SIS, money is being siphoned off from hospitals and health insurance companies.

The SIS found that the top underworld bodies are starting to concentrate on the industrial, energy, and transportation sectors. They also invest in ski resorts and take hold of production units that they gain through manipulated bankruptcy proceedings.

According to SIS findings, the top local mafia bodies are linked to or forge links with the Russian-Ukrainian underworld network.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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