Reader feedback: French voted against reform

Re: EU Constitution ratified, Volume 11, Number 19, May 16 - May 22, 2005

Why is it that every time a country says "Yes" to something EU related, either via parliament or through a referendum, they had to be lured into saying "Yes". Maybe they actually saw "the light" and voted "Yes" simply because they were clever. A treaty like this isn't really a constitution, but that doesn't mean that it is unimportant.

On the contrary, it states the civil rights we have, makes the system more streamlined in order to function with 25 members and increases the level of democracy by giving more power to the parliament.

That is important, but that is not what the French voted against. They voted against Slovakia, Poland, Hungary etc., against Chirac, against reforming their outdated, over costly social welfare system, against foreigners and so on.

When the "No" side gets their arms back down after celebrating their victory, they will find themselves in a situation where they have to live with something that is totally against what they wished for by rejecting this constitutional treaty.

It is an illogical result that can only end up making things worse than they were.

Jesper,
Denmark

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