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Culture Shorts

War pilot shares his experience


BRITISH ambassador to Slovakia, Judith Macgregor, ceremoniously christened Imrich Gablech's book Hallo, Airfield-control, Go Ahead on May 26. The 90-year-old Gablech is a Slovak veteran, whose memories as a war pilot were brought to readers thanks to BAE Systems and Magnet Press.

Published in Slovak, Gablech's book recounts his childhood in the Slovak countryside, first experiences flying in then Czechoslovakia, fleeing to Poland, being imprisoned in Siberian gulags, serving in the British Royal Air Force, and returning home.


Slovak art spills over Paris


THE Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris recently opened one of the year's largest presentations of Slovak contemporary fine art displayed abroad. Thirty-eight artists will exhibit their work there until June 11, the SITA news agency reported, including leading artists Jozef Jankovič, Viktor Hulík, Karol Baron and Milan Lukáč. Young talents Daniel Meluzín, Mariana Čundelíková, and Jana Ovšáková will also display works.

Cité Internationale des Arts owns 250 studios along the river Seine in the centre of Paris. The Slovak Artists Union acquired one of the studios in 1995 and has kept it constantly occupied.


Report on audio-vision made public


MEDIA Desk Slovensko recently published a report on the Slovak Audiovisual Situation in 2004.

Written by film publicist Miroslav Ulman, the report's 15 chapters offer a complete guide on last year's development in the production and distribution of films, videos and DVDs, audio-visual-related legislation, support, education, festivals, awards, and television development.

The report's English version was received positively during its presentation at the Cannes International Film Festival. For more information, visit www.mediadesk.sk.


Prepared by Spectator staff from press reports

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