Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Sixteen women among 50 new professors named by Gašparovič

SLOVAK President Ivan Gašparovič awarded the academic title "Professor" to 50 academics at the Hall of the Constitution in Bratislava castle June 13.

Among those honoured were public personalities such as actor Emil Horvath and sociologist Iveta Radicova, the TASR news wire wrote.

Presenting the letters of appointment to 34 men and 16 women, the president spoke against university tuition fees - a proposal for which was voted down in parliament last month.

"University study is already no longer cheap or free," he said.

The country's future, according to Gašparovič, is bound up with the education sector and investment into it. Much more attention should be paid to science and research at universities where Slovakia has great scope for improvement, he said, adding that universities should be more open to business and incoming foreign investors.

Gašparovič was appointing professors for the third time since taking office in June 2004. The last time he made professorial appointments was January 31.

Compiled by Magdalena MacLeod from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Crates and boxes. Slovaks discover new ways of grocery shopping

Farmer’s boxes are gaining customers in Slovakia as people slowly become more conscious about quality and the origin of the food they eat.

Blog: Are flying cars coming to the skies?

At least 19 companies, including a Slovak one, are currently developing flying car planes, but there are still many issues that must be worked out.

AeroMobil

What kind of expectations do some Slovaks have for world leaders?

Among EU member states, opinions of the United States declined in all but two — Poland (which makes some sense) and Slovakia (which does not).

Donald Trump

The biggest antiquarian bookshop from Leopoldov is stored in Trnava Photo

The new year could bring a new cultural centre in antiquarian bookshop.

Archive photo