Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Price of private highways more than double

A STRETCH of highway 30 kilometres long would cost Sk85 billion (€2.21 billion) if built privately. This is from Sk45 billion (€1.17 billion) to Sk53 billion (€1.38 billion) more than if a highway were built by the state, the daily Pravda reported.

However, a highway would be ready much sooner if built privately and the state could recoup some of the money through road charging.

It means that in the years 2010 to 2013 Slovakia would be able to build a highway from Bratislava to Košice, though at more than double the price it would cost for the state to build it.

These results stem from an analysis by Mott MacDonald, a consultancy firm that has been advising the government on highway construction.

"We will see how much we would really pay after we know the winner of a tender and its bid," said Peter Barek, head of the transport infrastructure department at the Ministry of Transportation, Post Office and Telecommunications.

Experts say that the bids would be probably be close to the consultant's estimations.

Marián Miškovič from the Transportation Ministry told the daily that highways constructed by private investors are always more expensive than if built by the state.

Compiled by Marta Ďurianová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Enough of Smer, people chanted in streets Video

Government resignation is not enough, the crowd called for early elections. This is how it looked like in Bratislava on March 16.

Fico fell. These are good, not perfect, developments

Unlike Kaczyński’s case there are two other parties in the coalition with Smer who can still bring the government down at any time.

Media are the ultimate frontiers in defending freedom in society today

Miklós Haraszti’s keynote speech at the Budapest award ceremony of the European Press Prize, March 14, 2018.

Fico is going. So why does the crisis continue?

These 10 answers will help you understand why the coalition’s decision to rebuild the government from scratch does not satisfy the critics and protesting masses.

Most-Híd chair Béla Bugár comes to the Government Office, March 13.