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Reader feedback: Progressive de-skilling

Re: Reader feedback: It's the same everywhere, Volume 11, Number 26, July 4 - 10, 2005

Bratislava's BBC correspondent Tamsin Smith said in a recent contribution: "the [Slovak] government's reform of the labour code ... makes this an attractive place to be. It's much more flexible than Western Europe, hiring and firing is easier, and it's easier to work longer hours."

The goal of the Slovak government appears to be to make Slovakia a sweatshop of Europe, with little social security. People in Slovakia often still take pride in and get satisfaction from their work. What I have seen in the UK over the past 10 to 20 years is a rapid decrease in pride and satisfaction, largely through the modern employment culture, where people are told that they should not think for themselves or use their own initiative, rather that they should simply follow a rule book, a process referred to as "de-skilling". A bit like painting by numbers. There are advantages to that outlook, the main of which is that it is easier to find people who have lower expectations of salary or conditions. But it leads to a demoralized workforce lacking in any job satisfaction.

I will be glad to retire and leave modern employment behind.

David, London,
UK

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