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Gašparovič sends Queen Elizabeth II condolences

PRESIDENT Ivan Gašparovič on July 8 sent a telegram of condolence to Queen Elisabeth II after a series of terrorist attacks killed dozens of people in London on July 7, the news wire TASR wrote.

The president conveyed his deepest sorrow to her Majesty, asking her to pass on his sympathies and those of the Slovak people to the bereaved.

"These inhumane acts strengthen our conviction that it is imperative for the entire democratic world to persevere in its common struggle against all forms of terrorism, and to work together to eliminate its sources," reads the telegram.

TASR also wrote that the Foreign Affairs Ministry has no information that Slovaks were among the victims of the July 7 terrorist attacks in London.

The Foreign Ministry and the Slovak Embassy in London are in constant contact with British officials. The ministry repeated an appeal to Slovaks in London to contact their families. The Foreign Affairs Ministry has also set up emergency phone lines. The Bratislava numbers are 5978 3252 and 5978 3247, and also, after 16:00 - 5978 22 11. In case of an extreme emergency, Slovak citizens can contact the Slovak Embassy in London on 0044 207 313 6470 or 0044 207 313 6471.

According to Tomaga, the British authorities have said that people can travel anywhere in London apart from the sites of the terrorist attacks in the city centre.

Compiled by Marta Ďurianová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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