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SPP proposes 22-percent gas hike as of October

GAS utility Slovenský plynárenský priemysel (SPP) yesterday submitted a proposal to the network regulator ÚSRO that gas prices go up by 22 percent for households as of October this year. The regulator has 30 days to decide on the proposal.

According to SPP, the reason behind the hike is the growth of oil and oil product prices as well as the weakening of the Slovak crown against the US dollar, the daily SME reported.

If ÚRSO approves the hike, an average household living in a family house that cooks and heats with gas will see their monthly bill go up by Sk650 (€16.75).

Households that use gas for cooking will only have to pay around Sk25 (€O.64) extra on average.

Analysts say, however, that the gas price hike would also be reflected in consumer prices and may slow down the real wage growth.

Heating companies are also planning to put their prices up in the autumn by five to eight percent, and this, together with the other rises in prices, would result in four percent inflation, not the originally projected three percent.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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