Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

German school to start in Bratislava

AFTER a nearly 60-year break there will again be a German school in Bratislava. The German-Slovak school will open in September and offer classes at kindergarten and first-year elementary school level.

AFTER a nearly 60-year break there will again be a German school in Bratislava. The German-Slovak school will open in September and offer classes at kindergarten and first-year elementary school level.

In addition to the core curriculum the school will offer classes in music, art, sport and foreign languages, including English. Children who do not yet speak German are welcome to attend. Both German- and Slovak-speaking teachers are being employed to team-teach children, so all children will soon become fluent in both languages.

The school's philosophy is to foster a climate of intercultural learning, where German, Slovak and other cultures meet.

Clauda Rüber, one of the school's founders said: "We will offer the children a wonderful chance to learn German and Slovak at an early age from native speakers. The children will profit all their lives from this. A Montessori-trained teacher from Germany will be class teacher in year one.

"We are putting the emphasis on creative and individualized teaching methods in a child-centred environment. We are a non-profit association and all parents will have a voice in the running of the school. We would also like to gain more sponsors to make the school fees affordable for all."

The school, located at Palisády 51 in Bratislava, will open on September 6, 2005.

For more information visit www.deutscheschule.sk


By Roderick Pritchard-Smith

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.