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SUMMER OF CULTURE AND CASTLE FESTIVAL

Banská Bystrica in the spotlight

TRENČÍN and Piešťany exported their artwork to Bratislava recently as part of the capital's summer festival. Now, it is Banská Bystrica's turn.

TRENČÍN and Piešťany exported their artwork to Bratislava recently as part of the capital's summer festival. Now, it is Banská Bystrica's turn.

On Wednesday, August 24, Banská Bystrica's artists and performers will descend on Bratislava, entertaining locals and visitors alike through Friday, August 26.

The Banská Bystrica programme, called Alive in Bystrica, Dead in Heaven, celebrates the day, 750 years ago, when King Béla IV granted Banská Bystrica the right to operate as a town.

Banská Bystrica has a rich artistic tradition, reflecting its economic importance starting in the 16th century, when the Thurza family, along with Jakub Fugger, founded the Thurza-Fugger mining company, which reached its height in the 18th century. For several hundred years the town's focus was on mining. The townspeople extracted and processed rare metals, exporting them to German, Polish, Italian and Dutch towns.

Culture in Banská Bystrica flourished, along with its economy. One of the first printing houses in the Slovak territory appeared there in 1577. The Slovak Scholastic Society was founded in Banská Bystrica in 1785, followed closely by the first Slovak literary revue.

Modern day Banská Bystrica has also played an important historical role. During WWII, the township became the centre of the anti-Fascist resistance as well as the national liberation movement. The Slovak National Uprising, the anti-Fascist military action, initiated in Banská Bystrica on August 29, 1944.

Over Banská Bystrica's three-day presentation, visitors to Bratislava's Main Square can watch Anton Anderle's puppet theatre show, The World's Smallest Circus, every afternoon between 16:00 to 19:00. At the same time they can enjoy contemporary dance presentations from the town's renowned Dance Studio and take in a documentary movie presentation.

Performers will take to the stage August 24, 25 and 26 at 20:00. A dulcimer trio (Hungarian-Slovak-Czech) will play on Wednesday night; the Dance Studio will perform Never-Ending Dance on Thursday; and local bands will entertain on Friday.


Prepared by Spectator staff

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