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SIS: Slovak explosives allegedly used in Hariri's assassination

EXPLOSIVES from Slovakia were allegedly used in the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik al-Hariri in February of this year, the daily SME reported, based on information from the French website Intelligence Online.

According to the website approximately 1,000 kilogrammes of RDX explosives, a standard military explosive, was used in the attack.

The Slovak Intelligence Service (SIS) declared that it already knew the information. "We have this information and we are trying to verify it," SIS spokesman Vladimír Šimko told the TASR news agency on September 6.

The information was revealed by former Syrian secret service officer Colonel Mohammed Safi to American and Saudi secret services.

Colonel Safi is a deserter who has revealed valuable information about four probable assassins - four generals close to Lebanon's pro-Syrian president Emile Lahoud. Safi also provided information about the explosives used in the killing of Hariri. According to Safi, the assassins bought the explosives from an as yet unknown Slovak company.



Compiled by Marta Ďurianová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

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