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CULTURE SHORTS

Steiner antiquarian forced to move

THE STEINER Antiquarian Bookstore at Ventúrska 20, a Bratislava landmark that has withstood the trials of each passing regime since it was founded 185 years ago, now faces another challenge. It has to relocate.
The antiquarian store, which sells books, period maps, postcards, photographs, artworks and musical scores, is well known to experts and laymen alike.

THE STEINER Antiquarian Bookstore at Ventúrska 20, a Bratislava landmark that has withstood the trials of each passing regime since it was founded 185 years ago, now faces another challenge. It has to relocate.

The antiquarian store, which sells books, period maps, postcards, photographs, artworks and musical scores, is well known to experts and laymen alike. It belongs to Selma Steinerová and Dagmar Ložeková, who reopened it after Communism ended, in 1991. Their achievement was recognized last February when they were honoured with the Bratislava Čučoriedka (Blueberry), an award given to those deemed to have most enriched the cultural life of Bratislava.

"We have to leave the antiquarian premises by September 15. We are unable to meet the financial demands of the house's new owner," Steinerová told the daily Pravda. Her great grandmother founded it in 1847.

The antiquarian bookseller will have to move only a few houses away, but the "genius loci" will be lost for good.

Compiled by Spectator staff from press reports

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