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SMK, KDH back off from early elections

THE RULING Hungarian Coalition party (SMK) will not submit a draft law to parliament to curtail the current election term, the daily SME reported. The decision was made at a meeting of the party’s leadership yesterday. The Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) is also no longer insisting on early elections.

According to the daily it now seems that the government will survive until the end of its official electoral term in September 2006.

SMK chief Béla Bugár said his party had changed it s mind because it had calculated it would not be able to get the 90 votes in parliament needed for a call for early elections. Bugár also said that should they have submitted the draft bill it would “absolutely destroy the relations in the coalition”.

The SMK and KDH have been considering the idea of early elections because the Slovak parliament was stopped from opening its autumn session for more than a week because the ruling coalition failed to get majority support. However, parliament was able to open when several independent MPs and two former Movement for a Democratic Slovakia MPs decided to back the coalition.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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