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Slovaks: Corruption rife in parliament

SLOVAKS tend to believe that there is a corrupt trade in votes in the Slovak parliament. A recent survey conducted by the Markant polling agency showed that 69.7 percent of those polled suspected that the ruling coalition was buying the votes of deputies to gain a majority in parliament. Only 12.8 percent believed that there were no corrupt proceedings around the voting.

After the departure of the New Citizen's Alliance, the opposition blocked parliament and the ruling coalition did not have enough votes to counter effectively and get parliamentary proceedings started. Markant conducted the poll from September 22nd to 27th, questioning 1,157 respondents.

Based on the poll, 31 percent think that corruption suspicions are founded while 38 percent think that the suspicions must be at least partially founded.

Supporters of the Slovak Communist Party (KSS) showed the highest tendency (93 percent of those polled) to believe that parliamentary deputies were corrupt, while supporters of the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) had the least tendency (32.6 percent).

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